BVSA Teaches: Technique for Slow Rollers

BVSA Teaches: Technique for Slow Rollers

On this episode of BVSA Teaches, Frank Ramppen talks about technique for slow rollers. Today we’re going to discuss one of the toughest plays in the infield, the slow roller running play where you run through the ball and make a throw on the run. This play requires athleticism and practice to master. The basic premise is to field the ball off your left foot and throw off your right foot. The timing is crucial. As you approach the ball, your left foot should be coming down as you field it. This allows you to transfer and throw while maintaining balance. The throw is usually a sidearm throw that may tail up the first base line. 

Some players may choose to come up and throw overhand if they can’t reach the target with a sidearm throw. It’s important to time your footwork correctly to make the play. When making the play barehanded, the timing is a bit different, but you have more time since there’s no need for a transfer. Kids often prefer the barehanded play, so it’s important to teach both methods. Practice and repetition are essential to improve timing and execution.

Contact Us!

Here at BV Sports Academy, we are a passionate group of dedicated baseball and softball instructors with some pretty impressive resumes. More importantly we have been educated by Bobby Valentine himself. We teach a proven curriculum that has developed some of the finest talent in our area, and we’re just getting started. We’re have been blessed to be joined by some of the top programs around when it comes to other sports like lacrosse and soccer. Parties for all ages, we do those too! There is something for everyone at BVSA. We look forward to helping all athletes become the best they can be. If you would like to book anything or have any further questions, please email [email protected] 

BVSA Teaches: Techniques for Backhanding a groundball

BVSA Teaches: Techniques for Backhanding a groundball

On this episode of BVSA Teaches, Frank Ramppen talks about techniques for backhanding a groundball. Hey guys, today we’re going to talk about backhanding a ground ball, and there are several different ways to do it. To be a good infielder, you need to be able to do them all. I know many coaches at the young ages teach their players to get in front of every ball they can, and I think that’s a good plan. However, there is one backhand technique that is much easier when you’re coming through the ball and changing direction than trying to get around it.

So, let’s talk about the basic backhand drills and positioning. First of all, you need to focus on your prep step, which we discussed before. As the pitch is thrown, the ball enters the hitting zone, and you should be landing in your ready position. Your left foot should be down on the ground, ready to react immediately.

Now, let’s say you’re playing shortstop and the ball is hit to your backhand side. Don’t stand up and run towards the ball or pivot your feet. Meanwhile, the reaction should be to stay low, cross over, and head for the ball. You need to stay low and get your head behind the glove and ball while keeping your glove open.

There are two ways to field the ground ball in this backhand situation. In the first method, you reach out with your left foot forward. You’re staying low and trying to get your head in behind the glove and ball. Make sure to keep your glove open and prevent it from turning. This technique is useful when the ball is hit hard.

Second Method for Backhands

The second method is based on timing. Again, you start by crossing over with a right-left movement towards the ball. In this case, your right foot reaches out to make the play. This technique is more like a “foot butt”. You’re keeping your head behind the ball, your glove open, and prevent it from turning.

After fielding the ball using either of these techniques, you need to put the brakes on and throw the ball back. You can either take baby steps and then step and throw or perform a jump throw if you have a strong arm. The jump throw involves fielding off your left and throwing off your right, simulating a throw off your right foot while you’re in the air. Obviously, it requires good arm strength and can be practiced separately.

For more information on backhanding a groundball, click the video below!

Contact Us!

Here at BV Sports Academy, we are a passionate group of dedicated baseball and softball instructors with some pretty impressive resumes. More importantly we have been educated by Bobby Valentine himself. We teach a proven curriculum that has developed some of the finest talent in our area, and we’re just getting started. We’re have been blessed to be joined by some of the top programs around when it comes to other sports like lacrosse and soccer. Parties for all ages, we do those too! There is something for everyone at BVSA. We look forward to helping all athletes become the best they can be. If you would like to book anything or have any further questions, please email [email protected] 

BVSA Teaches: Fielding a Ground Ball

BVSA Teaches: Fielding a Ground Ball

On this episode of BVSA Teaches, Frank Ramppen talks about fielding a ground ball. Hey guys, today we’re going to talk a little bit about the basics of defense and fielding ground balls. Remember, we’re talking about teaching kids of all ages, from little kids to big kids. The smaller, less athletic, and less informed some of these kids are, the more specific you have to be in your teaching.

When fielding a ground ball, we need to get down low into a position where we bend at our knees and waist. We should be able to see our glove out in front of us and the ball. It’s important to bend at the knees and waist enough so that when we get into this position, the kids can see the top of our head. This ensures they are low enough to see the ball and the glove. Forming a triangle with our body is often talked about. Most importantly, we need to have our hands out in front of us when fielding the ball.

Some people teach the “alligator” technique, where the glove is turned up like an alligator’s mouth. However, we don’t teach that here. When players use the alligator technique, their glove tends to turn up, which can cause the fingers of the glove to miss the ball or hit the heel at the bottom, causing it to bounce away. Instead, we teach players to put their glove down with the fingers pointing down slightly but not touching the ground.

Proper Glove Positioning

Fielding the ball slightly left of center is also important because it puts us in a better position to throw the ball since we’re usually moving in that direction. It’s easier to perform the proper footwork when we field the ball slightly left of center. Additionally, holding the glove slightly left or right of center increases our depth perception, making it easier to focus on the ball.

As the ball is bouncing towards us, there’s rhythm and timing involved. We want to time our movement to get to the ball in the best athletic position possible. Having great hands also requires having great feet. Our feet get us to the right position, so it’s important to read the bouncing ball and move our feet efficiently to get into the ultimate position to field the ball.

For more information, click the video below!

Contact Us!

Here at BV Sports Academy, we are a passionate group of dedicated baseball and softball instructors with some pretty impressive resumes. More importantly we have been educated by Bobby Valentine himself. We teach a proven curriculum that has developed some of the finest talent in our area, and we’re just getting started. We’re have been blessed to be joined by some of the top programs around when it comes to other sports like lacrosse and soccer. Parties for all ages, we do those too! There is something for everyone at BVSA. We look forward to helping all athletes become the best they can be. If you would like to book anything or have any further questions, please email [email protected] 

BVSA Teaches: Breakdown Drill

BVSA Teaches: Breakdown Drill

On this episode of BVSA Teaches, Frank Ramppen talks about the breakdown drill. Hey guys, here’s another fun little drill to help the kids run through the first base on a ground ball to the infield. Set up a little barricade with cones or wall buckets or whatever you have. Then, use little arrows to remind them that they have to break down and look right.

They’re going to do it all the way from home plate, where they’re running hard, free to the bag. Their attention should be on the base. Here’s my imaginary line, and I can run and then further go full speed. There’s a little obstacle to go right and break it. Now, I’m turning right and seeing what’s next.

Again, I love base running drills. They love little obstacles, so have some fun with it. Hope this helps!

Contact Us!

Here at BV Sports Academy, we are a passionate group of dedicated baseball and softball instructors with some pretty impressive resumes. More importantly we have been educated by Bobby Valentine himself. We teach a proven curriculum that has developed some of the finest talent in our area, and we’re just getting started. We’re have been blessed to be joined by some of the top programs around when it comes to other sports like lacrosse and soccer. Parties for all ages, we do those too! There is something for everyone at BVSA. We look forward to helping all athletes become the best they can be. If you would like to book anything or have any further questions, please email [email protected] 

BVSA Teaches: Banana Turn Drill

BVSA Teaches: Banana Turn Drill

On this episode of BVSA Teaches, Frank Ramppen talks about the banana turn drill. Hey guys, here’s a quick little easy drill that the kids love for teaching them the banana turn at first base on a base hit. Kids love running the bases, so be as creative as you can with drills for running the bases. They love to make it a competition, so use cones, baseballs, or whatever you have. They can practice directing their run and come up with a nice little gradual arc.

Have them start out on the play and then coming down hard. If they start that gradual arc and catch the inside of the bag while running by, they can practice their breakdowns over here. Another really good thing is to have one of the coaches or a ball bucket just right here off the bag. This forces them to catch the inside of the bag, whether it’s the right or left foot. This way, their body doesn’t hit whatever you put in place there. It’s really effective and really fun. Hope that helps!

Contact Us!

Here at BV Sports Academy, we are a passionate group of dedicated baseball and softball instructors with some pretty impressive resumes. More importantly we have been educated by Bobby Valentine himself. We teach a proven curriculum that has developed some of the finest talent in our area, and we’re just getting started. We’re have been blessed to be joined by some of the top programs around when it comes to other sports like lacrosse and soccer. Parties for all ages, we do those too! There is something for everyone at BVSA. We look forward to helping all athletes become the best they can be. If you would like to book anything or have any further questions, please email [email protected] 

BVSA Teaches: Baserunning from 3rd Base

BVSA Teaches: Baserunning from 3rd Base

On this episode of BVSA Teaches, Frank Ramppen talks about baserunning from 3rd base. Hey guys, today we’re talking specifically from third base. One thing that I haven’t mentioned on all the other bases and this is really, really important and this is another tool to throw your players to have in their toolbox. You’ve got to pay attention to the pitcher and his tendencies, his release point, and you could get really good jumps on bad pitches just by watching the pitcher’s release point. So you’re watching him, he’s throwing a lot of curveballs or a lot of sliders or a lot of dirt balls in general, you can kind of tell from his release point that he let go of that ball way too late and that’s really good chances of being a spiked ball that the catcher is not going to be able to stop. 

Being aggressive with your footwork, be aggressive anticipating that you’re going to take another base. The same thing when it’s up. Guys throwing high, throwing balls to the backstop, pay attention to his release point a little bit, give yourself every advantage you can. So now, especially at third base, you know you can taste it now, your whatever field you’re playing on that many feet away from scoring.

Coaching and Foul Territory

Alright, so third base, your third base coach here is giving you instructions and I’ve coached third base a lot my life and usually tell your player with less than two outs, whatever you’re choosing to do whether you’re playing contact and they’re going on any ball hit on the ground, that’s up to you in that particular situation but you’re teaching them that they need to freeze on the line and tag on a ball in the air. Of course you’ll tell them, they’ll take their lead, there will be a fly ball, and there they go. Let’s hope you’re really going to hammer that home. That when they’re on third base with less than two outs, they have to tag on a fly ball.

Okay, so your lead at third base has to be in foul territory. If the hitter hits a ball and unfortunately hits the baserunner, it’s going to hurt. But, in foul territory you’re not out, in fair territory you are. So when you take your lead, you need to be watching the pitcher, he’s the only guy that can get you out. At some of the younger ages, the third baseman will hold you on which is really weird. At the higher levels, there will be nobody holding you on but you should know where the third baseman is. You can take a peek back to see where he is. After that it is just between you and the pitcher. You’re watching his arm slot, not many pick offs at third but you have to look for the pickoffs. For more information, click the video below!

Contact Us!

Here at BV Sports Academy, we are a passionate group of dedicated baseball and softball instructors with some pretty impressive resumes. More importantly we have been educated by Bobby Valentine himself. We teach a proven curriculum that has developed some of the finest talent in our area, and we’re just getting started. We’re have been blessed to be joined by some of the top programs around when it comes to other sports like lacrosse and soccer. Parties for all ages, we do those too! There is something for everyone at BVSA. We look forward to helping all athletes become the best they can be. If you would like to book anything or have any further questions, please email [email protected] 

BVSA Teaches: Tagging at 2nd Base

BVSA Teaches: Tagging at 2nd Base

On this episode of BVSA Teaches, Frank Ramppen talks about tagging at 2nd base. Another point on the baserunning: When hitting a base hit to the outfield and rounding the base, you need to be aggressive and force the outfielder to stop. The distance you run before breaking down depends on where the ball is hit. If the ball is hit to right field, I make a hard turn with my right foot inside the bag. If it’s hit to left field, I break down a little shorter. The farther away the ball is hit, the more aggressive you should be with your turn before breaking it down. This is important because if the outfielder bobbles the ball, you can take the extra base easily.

In another scenario, when you’re on second base with nobody out and there’s a fly ball to the outfield, you need to be tagging. If you go halfway and the outfielder catches the ball, you have to go back to second. This puts your team in a bad position with one out and a runner on second. But if you tag up, you can get to third base, and now it’s first and third with nobody out. The setup for tagging will be different depending on where the ball is hit. For example, for a long fly ball to right field, you should hug the base like you’re in a stolen base position.

Instincts

Conversely, when there is one out and you’re on second base, you’re not automatically tagging. You’re going halfway, and if the ball drops, you need to score and get back to the base to tag up. Good baserunners will have an instinct for reading the play. They’ll know when a ball is hit really deep but really high. If the outfielder is running away, they can go back and tag up and still score. The rule of thumb is when there is one out, you’re going halfway and reading the play.

Contact Us!

Here at BV Sports Academy, we are a passionate group of dedicated baseball and softball instructors with some pretty impressive resumes. More importantly we have been educated by Bobby Valentine himself. We teach a proven curriculum that has developed some of the finest talent in our area, and we’re just getting started. We’re have been blessed to be joined by some of the top programs around when it comes to other sports like lacrosse and soccer. Parties for all ages, we do those too! There is something for everyone at BVSA. We look forward to helping all athletes become the best they can be. If you would like to book anything or have any further questions, please email [email protected] 

BVSA Teaches: Judging the distance of your turn

BVSA Teaches: Judging the distance of your turn

On this episode of BVSA Teaches, Frank Ramppen talks about judging the distance of your turn. Hey guys, I have another point on the base hit to the outfield and rounding the bases aggressively. The distance you run and how far you round the base depends on where the ball is hit. For example, if the ball is hit to right field and I know it’s a base hit. I’m going to make a good hard turn with my right foot inside of the bag. But if the ball is hit to the right fielder, I break down a little shorter. Opposed to if it was a base hit down the left field line or to the left-center field gap. 

The farther away the ball is hit, the more aggressive and far you get with your turn before you break it down. If the fielder bobbles the ball, you can take advantage and easily get to second base. However, if the ball is hit to right-center or right field, you need more of a bobble or kick to take that extra base. It’s important to teach players these techniques.

Contact Us!

Here at BV Sports Academy, we are a passionate group of dedicated baseball and softball instructors with some pretty impressive resumes. More importantly we have been educated by Bobby Valentine himself. We teach a proven curriculum that has developed some of the finest talent in our area, and we’re just getting started. We’re have been blessed to be joined by some of the top programs around when it comes to other sports like lacrosse and soccer. Parties for all ages, we do those too! There is something for everyone at BVSA. We look forward to helping all athletes become the best they can be. If you would like to book anything or have any further questions, please email [email protected] 

BVSA Teaches: Baserunning from 2nd Base

BVSA Teaches: Baserunning from 2nd Base

On this episode of BVSA Teaches, Frank Ramppen talks about baserunning from 2nd base. This video is about baserunning and leads, specifically at second base. Knowing where the defense is playing is critical for getting good jumps to score or get back on line drives. It’s important to not be scared at second base and to teach kids how to be a threat on the basepaths. When getting off the base, it’s essential to keep your eye on the pitcher, the only person who can get you out. Many kids turn around to look at the shortstop, but this shows the pitcher that the baserunner is scared. 

It’s also important to know the situation of the game. The outs, the hitter, and everything else to become a better baserunner. When shuffling off with your secondary lead, make sure your shoulders remain square to the plate to avoid giving the catcher an invitation to throw in behind you. Timing is crucial, and you should be prepared to react in any direction. If the ball is in the air, you must read it and freeze or run depending on the situation. The first base coach is your eyes for the shortstop, so be prepared when in your lead position. To learn more about baserunning from 2nd base, click the video down below!

Contact Us!

Here at BV Sports Academy, we are a passionate group of dedicated baseball and softball instructors with some pretty impressive resumes. More importantly we have been educated by Bobby Valentine himself. We teach a proven curriculum that has developed some of the finest talent in our area, and we’re just getting started. We’re have been blessed to be joined by some of the top programs around when it comes to other sports like lacrosse and soccer. Parties for all ages, we do those too! There is something for everyone at BVSA. We look forward to helping all athletes become the best they can be. If you would like to book anything or have any further questions, please email [email protected] 

BVSA Teaches: Baserunning from 1st Base

BVSA Teaches: Baserunning from 1st Base

On this episode of BVSA Teaches, Frank Ramppen talks about baserunning from 1st base. Hey everyone, today we will be discussing some important aspects of baserunning, specifically from first base. We teach a lot of kids at different levels, some that have leading, some that don’t. Here are a couple of key components to being a good baserunner and doing things the right way:

Firstly, when you get a hit, whether it’s to the outfield or infield, it’s not the time to celebrate. You need to listen to your first base coach and look at your third base coach for signs. Once you know what’s next, smart baserunners survey the land and check out the players’ positions. Especially the outfielders, so that you know without looking, or before looking, you have an idea of where they are.

You do not have to be fast to be a good baserunner; it helps, but I’ve seen lots of fast-paced runners who are not good baserunners. There are a lot of guys who aren’t as fast but are even better because they have instincts. They’re checking out and anticipating what’s going to happen. They give themselves every advantage they can to succeed at what they’re about to do.

Timing when Baserunning

The key element to successful baserunning is timing. Whether you’re in little league and leading off the bag or higher levels and taking your lead, timing is essential. When the pitcher throws the ball and the batter is about to hit it, you’ve got to be ready to go. You can’t be napping or daydreaming. You must anticipate the ball’s movement to be ready as soon as it reaches the point where you need to go.

As a baserunner at a level where leading is allowed, you need to talk about your leads. We like to lead off the base with our left foot, then right foot, and then shuffle off. We feel that this puts you in the best position not to get tricked by the pitcher. A quick step off when your legs are crossing over one another can get you picked off. The leads you take depend on the individual, but as a rule of thumb, you don’t want to take a lead that’s too short you have no chance to steal a base or beat a throw that you should beat to the base. 

Similarly, you don’t want to take a crazy long lead that will get you picked off. You’ll be thinking, “I’m going back, I’m going back.” You need to determine what that lead is for you, and usually, a couple of shuffles put you in a good position. The rule of thumb is that you should get far enough so that if the pitcher throws over you are a step and a dive away. For more information on baserunning from 1st base click the video below!

Contact Us!

Here at BV Sports Academy, we are a passionate group of dedicated baseball and softball instructors with some pretty impressive resumes. More importantly we have been educated by Bobby Valentine himself. We teach a proven curriculum that has developed some of the finest talent in our area, and we’re just getting started. We’re have been blessed to be joined by some of the top programs around when it comes to other sports like lacrosse and soccer. Parties for all ages, we do those too! There is something for everyone at BVSA. We look forward to helping all athletes become the best they can be. If you would like to book anything or have any further questions, please email [email protected]