Understanding Acceleration

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Understanding Acceleration

Understanding that acceleration is the most common and important motion in all team based sports is important. Points, games, championships are won on an athlete’s ability to get from point A to Point B the quickest. Acceleration and speed are often interchanged. However, according to physics, they’re not the same. Acceleration is the rate you change speed divided by time, and speed is the distance travelled divided by time.  When you’re moving at a constant of 20mph, your speed is 20mph and your acceleration is zero mph. As a strength coach it’s important to understand this distinction and have a basic understanding of physics.  Important components to understand acceleration in sports are Newton’s First and Second Laws of Physics.

Newtown's First Law

A body at rest will stay at rest. A body in motion will stay in motion unless acted upon by an external force.  Newtons first law predicts the behavior of objects when forces are balanced. The object will not accelerate unless forces become unbalanced. Next is Newton’s Second Law, the law of Acceleration.

Newtown's Second Law

Newton’s Second Law – The 2nd law states acceleration is dependent on the net force applied to the object and the objects mass.  Acceleration is equal to net Force divided by Mass. Let’s say Athlete A is 185lb and Squats 405lb while Athlete B is 205lb and Squats 405lb. Athlete A will have a higher potential to accelerate their body.  Newton’s second law explains how force production, rate of force development and the athlete’s relative body strength collaborate in developing acceleration ability.

In conclusion, Newton’s laws help us understand the laws that govern motion. BVT Lab uses that understanding to design the training framework which helps athletes improve their acceleration. The next part of this article series will cover Newton’s 3rd law and biomechanics.

BVT Lab

BVT Lab

Director of Performance

Bio Motor Abilities and Athletic Potential

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Bio Motor Abilities and Athletic Potential

As a strength and conditioning coach a little over the last four years, I’ve been lucky to train athletes across all levels and abilities. During my time as a coach, it’s apparent that not all athletes are created equal.  Some athletes possess innate abilities that others do not. It’s not by chance that some athletes improve significantly faster than others; once exposed to training stimulus, or learning a new sports skill. All sports require the mastery of certain skills and complex movements for athletic success. The athlete’s ability to learn and master skills and movements is strongly dependent on their genetic bio motor abilities and other biological systems.

What are the main Bio Motor Abilities?

Speed- The least trainable ability, it’s the function of your CNS to move your limbs and your body to perform movements as quickly as possible. Stride Frequency X Stride Length=Speed.

Strength – The ability to produce force

Endurance – The athletes work capacity, their ability to perform work at an intensity over a certain period of time.

Coordination – Intra-muscular and Inter-muscular coordination to perform movements and sports skills efficiently.

Flexibility – Range of a joint. Joint angle will dictate muscle recruitment.

There are countless other abilities that are the combination of the main abilities, Power (Strength and Speed), Mobility (Flexibility and Coordination), Agility (Power, Speed, Coordination, Flexibility).

Why understanding these abilities are important for athletic success?

It’s important to understand that most sports are going to be the combination of 2-3 of these abilities. As a coach, we analyze the physiological demands of their sport/event to help prepare an athlete for their specific sport. In order for the athlete to have a better chance at performing the skills and movements required to succeed in their sport, we have to train and develop the bio motor abilities and qualities demanded by the sport.  All athletes have a genetic ceiling. However, it’s only through training all these abilities can be maximized. Usain Bolt was gifted with more fast twitch fibers than most humans and the advantage of being 6ft5 while still having a stride frequency equal to other world class sprinters. However, he would’ve never reached his peak and set the world record for the 100m without hard work and dedication to training.

BVT Lab

BVT Lab

Director of Performance

Strength and Conditioning

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Strength and Conditioning

This is my first try at writing an article.  Hopefully there will be many more to come about sports performance training and the science based approach we take at the BVT Lab.  I think every strength and conditioning coach at their core begins their career in this field with a genuine desire to help every athlete they train reach their goals and potential. Some of my criticisms in this article aren’t directed towards coaches but the field as a whole.  My intention is to contribute what I can to help in the progression and professionalization of Strength and Conditioning.  All of my inspirations in the field of strength and conditioning have one important thing in common. That is their willingness to share knowledge and information with younger coaches such as myself, parents, and athletes for free in the hopes of progressing the field. The Strength and Conditioning field is young and has really exploded the last 20 years. However, it’s behind the fields of sports medicine, and physical therapy in terms of knowledge and professional standards, even though they’re all different points in the same spectrum.

Lack of Knowledge and Misinformation Is Holding The Field Back


Most coaches make the mistake of training their athletes like how they train, and letting ego dictate the training. The beginning of my career was no different. I was very fortunate early in my coaching career to learn from Seth Foreman.  He was lucky enough to have learned from Pete Bommarito and Loren Seagrave during his time at IMG Academy.  I wasn’t aware enough then to realize how valuable the information I was learning.  Most coaches might never have the opportunity to learn from more experienced coaches.  As a result the amount of qualified strength and conditioning coaches is very small.  Due to this lack of knowledge from coaches, misinformation spreads to parents, and athletes.  I don’t believe it’s the intention of most coaches to mislead parents and athletes. However, the lack of knowledge leads to unrealistic goals, failure, performance decline as well as increases chance of injury. I’ve experienced it countless times. For example, a parent and athlete walking in and asking me to get the athlete faster for a showcase or combine coming up in a few days.  I have to be the person that tells them that speed is the least trainable bio-motor ability, and it will take minimum 8-12 weeks to cause enough adaptation to improve it. 

The growth of social media has led to the rise of the Instagram coach.  As a result, anybody can become a strength and conditioning coach as long as they have an endless list of drills and exercises. Having a vast library of drills and exercises alone is not what makes you a good coach.  There needs to be some understanding of physiology, anatomy, programming and manipulating training variables for specific adaptations, and communication. The “Sports Specific Training” phenomena is the result of lack of knowledge from coaches and realizing it’s easier to sell to clients when coaches say “Sports specific training.” Parents and athletes walk in the gym for the first time and believe the athlete will get faster and improve performance if they perform the sport motions with their lacrosse stick. The lack of understanding across the board has created this misconception that the sport can be recreated within the training, it cannot. The exact stimulus while playing the sport can’t ever be recreated in the training. The development of strength is the foundation of sports training.  “Sports Specific Training” in reality is to transfer this strength to enhance the qualities demanded by the sport using joint specific angles, and specific velocities that are similar to the sport actions performed in the sport.

BVT-Lab Approach To Sports Performance Training


I have learned in this field to ensure the most success for your athletes, the training must always be in the best interest of the athlete.  As a coach you must always have an open mind, and be the first one to continuously scrutinize your own training methods. There are different methods to training athletes correctly, all these methods will always follow universal scientific principles of sports science. As a coach, I would be lying if I were to say I was all knowing or I’ve never made mistakes training athletes.  Learning from others with more experience and knowledge than myself, I make it my obligation to never be satisfied in my quest for more knowledge in order to keep helping athletes reach their goals.  Come down to the BV Training Lab at BVSA to learn how to get faster and stronger through science!!

Special Thank You To:

Seth Foreman
Pete Bommarito
Cal Dietz
Niccolo Del Duca 

Renick Jeune

Renick Jeune

Writer and Editor

BVT Lab

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BVT Lab

BVSA is excited to introduce the Bobby Valentine’s Training Lab. Bobby Valentine and his team are rebranding the BV Training Lab at Bobby Valentine’s Sports Academy (BVSA)! BVT Lab is now the official strength and conditioning program of BVSA’s 40,000 square foot facility.

Since moving to our new location in March of 2017, BVSA has been very fortunate to have tremendous trainers in our gym, working with our athletes.  They have each had a proven track record in making athletes and individuals bigger, faster, stronger and healthier resulting in improved performance on the playing field and a better lifestyle for non athletes.  

Originally a part of the AAD team, Renick Jeune and Carrington Beckford transitioned into their own partnership, Overdrive Elite Performance.  They  continued to gain the trust of our community and beyond.   As Overdrive continued to grow and help athletes reach their goals, the partners also had their own goals and have decided to pursue their individual goals separately.  

Carrington is going to carry on the Overdrive name moving forward in nearby locations while Renick will now become the leader of the BV Training Lab at BVSA, along with Mike Statuti.  The BVT Lab will be proprietary to BVSA, personally created by Renick and his team along with Bobby Valentine and our many resources.  It was originally the goal of BVSA to own and operate BVSA Fitness but the transition to our new, much larger space in 2017 created many challenges on it’s own.  We now believe the timing is perfect for us to transition into our own fitness culture. 

We are very excited for the BVT Lab and what it will offer our athletes and non athletes.  Using a scientific approach to training, the BVT Lab lines up perfectly with the mission at BVSA: Inform, Instruct and Inspire.  If you or anyone you know is looking to run faster, hit harder or just have a healthier lifestyle, the BVT Lab is the place for you.  

“Renick and Mike really know how the body works and it shows in their programming.  It has been fun to see them help shape some great athletes.  The adult training they have developed has been a hit as well.  We are excited to see how their formulas will continue to crank out high end results.” said Anthony Conte. 

BVT Lab will be joining a group of great organizations that have already made BVSA their home.  First County Bank, YB Realty, Instant Replay Sporting Goods, CT City Lax, JA Elite Soccer, NC Rams, Lady Titans, BVSA Fury and so many others are all under one roof with the same mission: to help provide opportunities for future generations to live healthy and fulfilled lives! 

Sign up for the BVSA mailing list to stay up to date on all upcoming programs!

Anthony Conte

Anthony Conte

Writer and Editor